Gothic Furniture
The Gothic Revival style is one of many early Victorian tastes. Though Thomas Chippendale incorporated Gothic motifs in his furniture in the mid-eighteenth century, the Gothic Revival originates in the nineteenth century Romantic Movement and especially from the writings and designs of the English architect Augustus Pugin in the 1830s. Pugin promoted Gothic design for religious reasons, believing it to be the most Christian style. 

In this country the Gothic Revival Style was taken up by two very prominent architects, Andrew Jackson Downing and Alexander Jackson Davis, who both published designs for Gothic houses, landscaping, and furniture. Lyndhurst, a mansion in Tarrytown, New York, designed by Davis in 1838, is probably the most outstanding example of Gothic Revival domestic architecture in America. Davis also designed much of the furniture for Lyndhurst. Probably because Gothic designs tend to be intricate, and thus expensive to execute, the Gothic Revival Style had a limited appeal.   Outside of churches and church furnishings, the style was largely out of fashion by the 1860s

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RALSTON FURNITURE REPRODUCTIONS 
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