Chippendale Furniture
In 1754 Thomas Chippendale, the English cabinetmaker and designer, published The Gentleman and Cabinet Maker's Director in London, promoting a style that in America bears his name, but is known in England as Rococo.  This generally marks the beginning of the Chippendale period, though in fact Chippendale and others had been making furniture in this style for some time. 

In American cities this style predominated by the end of the 1750s.  Chippendale continued, but greatly elaborated on, the general precepts of the Queen Anne Style. Most importantly, he added elaborate carvings.  Intricate curves and fancy hardware became a more prominent part of the decoration too.  Most noteworthy is the cabriole leg ending in a carved claw-and-ball foot, an icon of Chippendale furniture.  Chippendale also sometimes incorporated Chinese and Gothic motifs into his designs.  Mahogany replaced walnut in most high style pieces.

As in Queen Anne furniture, English Chippendale furniture tends to be much more ostentatious than American-made pieces.  Even furniture made in Philadelphia and Newport, the two regions where the best and most elaborate American Chippendale furniture was produced,  seems sober by comparison.  But the more reserved colonial pieces, I think, display a stateliness and presence unmatched by their more flamboyant English counterparts.  
 

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